Bishop Steven’s Easter Message

bishopOne of the great figures of the Quaker movement, Isaac Pennington, wrote these words in a letter to his friends in 1667. “Our life is love and peace and tenderness and bearing with one another and forgiving one another and not laying accusations one against one another and helping one another up with a tender hand”

To be a Christian is to live a life of gentleness and peace and tenderness and mercy and love together. As I have read the story of the passion of Jesus in John’s gospel this year, I have been struck very powerfully by this theme of the gentleness of Jesus Christ: it is a robust gentleness, a gentleness combined with steel but gentleness none the less.

The risen Lord we celebrate today is gentle, merciful, tender and kind. His character is consistent.  It is not spoiled and made bitter by the terrible suffering he endures, by denial or betrayal.  It is not changed by his resurrection, by his new and risen life.

Before the cross, Jesus Christ, the Son of God, washes his disciples feet..  Feet. After the resurrection, Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, cooks breakfast for his friends. Here is something to ponder deeply this Easter. Jesus Christ calls his Church, his friends, to be like him in his gentleness and love.

The vocation of the Church is to be a community of gentleness and mercy in a world which is often harsh and often violent. We are the Church.  We are called into being by Jesus Christ, who was crucified and rose again.  The gentle, risen Lord.  We are called to reflect his love in a world of violence, hurt, hunger and confusion.

If you own the name of Christian, you are called to reflect this gentle strength in all you do: in your work and in your leisure, in your actions and in your character, in your words and in your deeds. We are called together to be like him in his gentleness: at the anointing, at the footwashing, at the cross, in the garden, in the upper room, by the lakeside.

“Our life is love and peace and tenderness and bearing with one another and forgiving one another and not laying accusations one against another and helping one another up with a tender hand”.

Taken from .
(For the full text, see www.sheffield.anglican.org)